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Full text of "New York Hospital School of Nursing Announcement"

THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 




Created by Royal Charter in 1771 
in the Reign of King George III 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1940-1941 

VOLUME X NUMBER I 



If after reading this bulletin there are 
further questions, write to the Director of the 
School of Nursing, The New York Hospital, 
525 East Sixty-eighth Street \ New York, N. Y. 
An application form will be sent upon request 
if an applicant is able to satisfy the entrance 
requirements. 





HOTICE 






Because 


of Miss Anna D. 


v;oif»s 


resignation, 


inquiries should be 


addressed tc 


> Miss Bessie A. 


R. 


Parker, new 


Director of 


the 


School 


of Nursing • 










THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



THE SOCIETY OK THE NEW YORK HOSPITA] 

THE 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Associated with Cornell University 




Created by Royal Charter in 1771 
in the Reign of King George III 



Announcement 



i 9 4. o . 1941 
Volume x Number i 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/newyorkhospitals19401941newy 



CALENDAR 



1940 
September 28 Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 
September 30 .... Winter Term begins — Classes convene 
October 12 Columbus Day (Not a holiday for first 

year students) 
November 28 Thanksgiving Day — A holiday 

Date subject to change by Presidential decree 

December 24) ... . Christmas Vacation (First year stu- 

January 2 / dents) 

December 25 Christmas Day — A holiday 

1941 

January 1 New Year's Day — A holiday 

January 3 Classes convene 

January 19 Winter Term ends 

January 20 Spring Term begins — Classes convene 

February 12 Lincoln's Birthday — A holiday 

February 22 Washington's Birthday — A holiday 

May n Spring Term ends 

May 12 Summer Term begins — Classes convene 

May 30 Memorial Day — A holiday 

July 4 Independence Day — A holiday 

September 1 Labor Day — A holiday 

September 27 .... Matriculation and Registration (First 

year students) 
September 28 .... Summer Term ends 

(Four weeks' vacation and three weeks' vacation 
within the summer term for second and first year 
students respectively; two weeks' vacation for 
third year students during psychiatric assignment.) 

September 29 .... Winter Term begins — Classes convene 

No classes will be held on the above noted holidays. 



[ 5 ] 



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LOBBY OF NURSES RESIDENCE 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



History 



THE New York Hospital, the second oldest hospital in 
America, maintained by private endowment, received its 
charter of incorporation under George the Third of England on 
the thirteenth day of June, 177 1, under the title of the Society 
of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. Subse- 
quently by an Act of the Legislature in 18 10 the title was 
changed to The Society of The New York Hospital. 

The first systematic training for nurses, through lectures and 
practical instruction on the wards, was begun in 1799 under the 
direction and tutelage of Dr. Valentine Seaman and continued 
throughout his association with the hospital until 18 17. 

The school of nursing, an integral part of the hospital, cele- 
brated the sixtieth anniversary of its founding in 1937 and points 
with just pride to its fifteen hundred graduates who have served 
their communities in bedside care of patients in homes and hospi- 
tals and have shared in administration and teaching in hospitals, 
schools of nursing and public health organizations. 

In June 1927 The New York Hospital formed an association 
with the Cornell University Medical College. The resources of 
each institution were increased and an extensive program of 
building was begun. The new plant situated on York Avenue 
between Sixty-eighth and Seventy-first Streets was opened Sep- 
tember 1932 and offers unusual opportunities and facilities for 
the progressive development of the school of nursing. 

The school of nursing is registered with the Regents of New 
York State which permits its graduates to take the state board 
examinations in order to secure state registration and has applied 
to the National League of Nursing Education for accreditation. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of Sur- 
geons, approved for internships by the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and is a member of the American Hospital Association. 



7 ] 



Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women with exceptional 
personal and professional qualifications who are interested in 
social welfare. The aim of The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing is to prepare carefully selected students in the 
fundamental principles of nursing in its various clinical aspects 
as applied to home, hospital and public health services, with 
emphasis upon health teaching. The development of the indi- 
vidual student as a responsible member of civic and social life is 
a significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent to the 
hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well equipped class- 
rooms, laboratories, library and recreation rooms as well as 
attractive and comfortable living accommodations for students 
and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are avail- 
able through association with the Cornell University Medical 
College. 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsur- 
passed for the care and study of patients. The hospital with a 
potential capacity of one thousand beds admits all types of 
patients including medical, surgical, obstetrical, gynecological, 
pediatric and psychiatric, and the out-patient department pro- 
vides ample opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients. 

Affiliation is made with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Serv- 
ice for field experience in public health nursing and with the 
Lobenstine Clinic for observation in obstetrical nursing in homes 
and prenatal and postnatal instruction. 

The social service department of The New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing course through the integration of 
social service in the program of study. 



[ 8 ] 



Requirements for Admission 

Each applicant must present a qualifying certificate from the 
Board of Regents of the State of New York, application for 
which may be secured from the Bureau of Qualifying Certificates, 
State Education Department, Albany, New York, or it will be 
sent an applicant from the office of the Director of the School 
of Nursing after application for admission to the school has 
been filed. 

The matriculation requirement is satisfactory graduation from 
an accredited high school or recognized preparatory school in 
which the following units of study have been taken : 

English 4 units 

History i unit 

Civics y 2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

(Algebra 1 unit; plane geometry 1 unit) 
Science 2 units 

(Chemistry required; physics advised) 
Foreign Language 3 units 

(Three units of one language or two in 

each of two) 
Electives 3^ units 

Total 16 units 

Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of applicants. Preference 
in admission will be given to those who have had advanced study. 
It is advised that prospective students from college have intro- 
ductory chemistry, zoology or biology, physics and psychology. 
All students should review arithmetic prior to admission. 

Exceptions to these matriculation requirements may be made 
only by offering substitutions satisfactory to the Committee on 
Admissions. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements applicants 
should be at least eighteen and not over thirty years of age and 
must present evidence of physical and personal fitness for nursing. 

[ 9 ] 



A personal conference of the applicant and her parent or 
guardian with the director of the school of nursing is desirable 
and should be arranged after formal application has been sub- 
mitted to the school. An appointment for an interview will be 
made upon request. 

At their own expense applicants must also present a report 
from the Testing Service Division for Schools of Nursing of the 
Psychological Corporation. Upon application to the New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, the card of application for admis- 
sion to this examination will be forwarded to the applicant with 
necessary instructions. 

The Admissions Committee takes into account all informa- 
tion received from these various sources in judging the suitability 
of an individual for admission to the school of nursing. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, The New York Hospital, 
525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York, New York. 

Citizenship Requirements 

According to the law of New York State every person ad- 
mitted to the examination for license as registered nurse in New 
York State at the termination of her course of study must sub- 
mit evidence that she is a citizen of the United States or has 
declared her intention of becoming a citizen. Such a license shall 
terminate and become void at the end of seven years from such 
declaration of intention if the holder has not become a citizen. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing may be granted those students who pre- 
sent credentials showing satisfactory completion of courses of 
study taken in other schools deemed of similar or equal value 
to those given in The New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree may 
have her time in the school reduced by two or four months if 
she maintains a scholastic standing of an average of "B" grade 
in the first and second years provided this request is presented 
the last term of the second year. 

[ 10] 




STUDENT CARES FOR CONVALESCENT PATIENT IN SOLARIUM 




THE PLAY TEACHER 



Accrediting by Cornell University 

To those students who may later wish to matriculate at the 
New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell Uni- 
versity, if they present all other necessary requirements, the 
curriculum of The New York Hospital School of Nursing will 
be credited to the amount of not less than forty-five hours, which 
is equivalent to one and a half academic years of college credit, 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding of 
the basic sciences and principles underlying good nursing and 
of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, in the pre- 
vention of disease, and in health education. 

Each of the three school years is divided into terms of six- 
teen weeks each. 

During the first term and a half limited nursing practice is 
given in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics of the out- 
patient department while a greater amount of time is spent in 
class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven and one-half terms 
the student's nursing practice increases in length of time and 
in responsibility. A sequence is planned to include the various 
types of clinical services during day, evening and night periods 
and visiting nursing in order that the student may acquire com- 
plete understanding of patients' needs. 

During these clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours per week which includes all class and nursing prac- 
tice assignments. 

Requirements of Scholarship for Promotion 
and Graduation 

Students are graded in their studies on a basis of weighted 
quality points with an average of two quality points required 
for promotion without condition and graduation. 

[12] 



The following grading system has been established: 

A — Excellent 4 quality points 

B — Good 3 quality points 

C — Average 2 quality points 

D — Pass 1 quality point 

F — Failure o quality point 

I — Incomplete . . . Given in cases of absence and 

not because of poor scholarship 

A major warning is given if work is not of at least an average 
quality which is required for promotion without condition. 

A grade of C is required in the course Introduction to Nurs- 
ing Arts, a grade of B in that unit dealing with dosage. A grade 
of D in nursing practice in any major field of nursing places 
a student on major warning. 

Failure in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other 
respects in which case repetition of the course may be recom- 
mended by the instructor. 

General Administrative Policies 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing reserves the 
privilege of retaining in the school only those students who in 
the judgment of its faculty satisfy its requirements of scholar- 
ship, health and personal suitability for the nursing profession. 
It also reserves the prerogative of changing its curriculum, 
educational policies and fees as deemed necessary for the pro- 
gressive development of the school. 

Registration and Orientation 
First-year students entering in the fall of nineteen hundred 
and forty must register at the school by ten o'clock on Satur- 
day morning, September twenty-eighth; those entering in the 
fall of nineteen hundred and forty-one on Saturday, September 
twenty-seventh. 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students have necessary physical examinations 
with Schick, Dick and Mantoux tests, confer with faculty advis- 
ers and secure uniforms, books and other equipment. 

[13] 




THE GREEN DINING ROOM 




STUDY IN THE LIBRARY 



Fees 

Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Payable at registration; not refundable. 

Tuition Fee 100.00 

Payable at registration $75.00 

Payable at beginning of second term, first 
year 25.00 

Not refundable. 

Laboratory Fee (Anatomy, Chemistry, Microbiol- 
ogy, Nursing, Nutrition, Physiology) 25.00 

Payable at registration; not refundable. 

Chemistry Breakage Fee 5.00 

Payable at registration; amount not used for break- 
age to be refunded, or excess breakage to be paid. 

Library Fee 5-oo 

Payable at registration $2.00 

Payable first term, second year 1.50 

Payable first term, third year 1.50 

Not refundable. 

Health Service Fee 20.00 

Ten dollars payable at registration and five at be- 
ginning of first terms, second and third years. 

Graduation Fee 15.00 

Payable at beginning of third term, third year. Re- 
fundable if student is not graduated. 

Total Fees for The New York Hospital School 

of Nursing Si 80.00 

Tuition Fee for Henry Street Visiting Nurse 

Service 25.00 

Total School Fees s 205. 00 

In addition to these fees students pay a Student Activity Fee 
of $5.00 each year which is collected by the class treasurer. 

[15] 



Maintenance and General Expenses 

The school of nursing provides maintenance and limited gra- 
tuitous care in case of illness and furnishes each student with 
the uniform and cap of the school which remain the property 
of the school. Note health regulations and service on page 17. 



The following estimated expenses must be met by the student 

istyr. 2nd yr. 3rdyr. Optional 

ist term 

Uniform aprons, bibs and 

accessories .... $22.00 $4.00 

Uniform shoes .... 8.50 8.50 

Uniform sweater . . . 4.00 

Uniform cape .... $15.00 

Rental of two laboratory 

coats 1. 00 

Rental of four Henry 

Street uniforms . . . 5.00 

Books, keys, bandage scis- 
sors and miscellaneous 
supplies 20.00 $10.00 5.00 15.00 

Expenses for district visits 

and excursions . . . 5.00 5.00 25.00 



$60.50 $15.00 $47.50 $30.00 



None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased be- 
fore admission to the school. Students should be provided with 
an allowance for other personal needs determined by individual 
requirements. A list of limited necessary personal equipment 
will be sent each prospective student when accepted for admis- 
sion. For the three-year course the total cost to the student 
should not exceed three hundred and fifty dollars in addition to 
personal expenditures as determined by the student. 

[16] 



Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its stu- 
dents. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is pro- 
vided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination by the 
school physician with chest x-rays is required upon admission to 
the school and subsequent annual physical examinations will be 
given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be re- 
quested of all students before admission to the school. Schick 
and Dick tests and immunization for positive reaction to the 
Schick test will be required of all students before or after admis- 
sion to the school. Mantoux tests will be given during the pre- 
clinical period and for those who are negative will be repeated at 
regular intervals. 

Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited 
to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in 
the hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for the 
first-year students and not more than four weeks at any one 
time for second and third year students. Expenses for special 
nursing care and special therapies must be borne by the student 
or her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four weeks 
is given and during the third year one of two weeks. For first- 
year students one week's vacation is planned at Christmas (see 
calendar) and three weeks during the summer term. For all 
second-year students a vacation of four weeks is planned dur- 
ing the summer term of the year. For third-year students a two 
weeks' vacation is given during any one of the three terms. 
This vacation is not given to those students who have an ex- 
emption of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to con- 
form to the requirements of the educational program and the 
fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

[17] 



Except for first-year students during their first term, holidays 
are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration may 
be changed and in necessary instances nursing practice will have 
to be made up. 

Student Loan Fund 

A student loan fund has been established to give necessary 
financial aid to those who show promise in nursing. These finan- 
cial benefits are not available to first-year students until after 
their first term's work. 

Applications for student loans should be made in writing to 
the Director of the School. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must 
include activities relating to healthful social relationships gen- 
erous provision for this development in the life of the student 
has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected adja- 
cent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these activities. 
Every effort has been made in its construction and equipment to 
provide for the normal and healthy life of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains attractively 
furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, ample common baths, 
showers and toilet facilities, a common sitting-room with ad- 
joining kitchenette for informal gatherings and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining-rooms are 
on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large well equipped gym- 
nasium, billiard-room, game-room, tennis courts and porches are 
available. Arrangements for the use of an outdoor playground 
and an indoor swimming pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities 
well qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social and 
recreational activities of the school. 

[18] 



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A ROOM OF HER OWN 




SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST IN THE FLOOR SITTING ROOM 



School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in which 
the students take an active part. A student organization has 
been established and functions with the Faculty Committee 
on Student Extra-Curricular Activities in all matters relating to 
social and professional conduct and discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of five dollars is required and 
collected by each class. 



20 ] 



THE CURRICULUM 



First Year 



Anatomy 

Chemistry 

Microbiology . 

Physiology 

History of Nursing 

Elementary Psychology 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

Introduction to Nursing Arts . 

Professional Adjustments I . 

Nutrition and Cookery 

Diet Therapy 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health 
and Disease 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

Medicine 

Communicable Diseases 

Medical Nursing 

Surgery 

Surgical Nursing 

(Orientation — 22 hours — no credit, in- 
cludes Personal Hygiene — 8 hours) 

Total 696 



Class and Approximate 
laboratory Hours 
Hours Practice 


Credit 
Hours 


60 


2 


57 


2 


66 


2 


45 


1/2 


30 


2 


30 


2 


15 


I 


125 309 


6/ 2 


15 


1 


30 


1/2 


30 


1K2 


30 


2 


30 


2 


>;} - 


4 


15 480 


5 


44 


3 


15 480 


5 



1269 



44 



[21] 



Second Year 



Class and Approximate 
Laboratory 



Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Operative Technique 15 

Pediatrics 30 

Pediatric Nursing 30 

Obstetrics and Gynecology .... 30 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 30 
Development of Behavior in Children 30 



ppioximau 

Hours 
Practice 


' Credit 
Hours 


192 


itf 


192 


1K2 


369 


4 


. . . 


ij4 


708 


sy 2 


. . . 


2 


708 


8 




2 



Totals 165 



2169 



29 



Third Year 



Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Surgical Nursing 

Emergency Nursing 

Psychiatry 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Special Therapeutics 

Family and Community Health 

Community Nursing Practice 

Out Patient Nursing Practice 

Private Patient Nursing Practice 

Professional Adjustments II 

Totals .... 



Grand Total Hours and Credit 



20 

45 
30 

20 



1007 



280 

96 

376 



547 
146 

384 
192 
192 



46 2213 



5651 



2K2 

1 

I 

3 
6 

1 

1 

3 

2 
2 

1 



27 



100 



Two or more hours per week of bedside instruction and individual conferences, 
which approximate a total of two hundred, and fifty hours, are included in the 
practice assignments. 

[221 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Preclinical Sciences 

i. Anatomy 

This course Includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. 
The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations and 
student dissection of the cadaver. The microscopical work is 
directly correlated with the gross dissection and includes a de- 
tailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological infor- 
mation is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Yntema 

2. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental 
principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry with special 
application to nursing practice. Studies in the general composi- 
tion of the blood and urine, and in the digestion and utilization 
of foods are included. Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

57 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Microbiology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorganisms 
emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, modes and 
prevention of infection; disinfection and asepsis; the more im- 
portant tissue changes occurring in the healing process, infec- 
tions and neoplasms; clinical microscopy of the blood and blood 
grouping; kidney function and urinalysis. Practical demonstra- 
tions and applications are made which relate directly to nursing. 
The blood group of each student is ascertained and recorded. 
Lectures, recitations and laboratory. 

66 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Stillman 

4. Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental weights, measures, terms and symbols used in the 
preparation and administration of drugs, common antiseptics, 
disinfectants and other solutions. A study of important and com- 
monly used drugs; their preparation, dosage, administration, 
physiological and therapeutic actions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative 
and minor toxic symptoms, antidotes and emergency treatments. 
Emphasis is placed on the accurate administration of drugs and 

[23] 



the careful observation of their effects through supervised prac- 
tice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Daum 
5. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the 
functions of the normal human body as an essential prerequisite 
to the study of health and nutrition and the pathological changes 
due to disease. Lectures, recitations, laboratory and demonstra- 
tions. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

Medical Nursing 

1. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures 
and clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize or 
interpret required reading covering etiology, sources of infec- 
tion, symptomatology, usual course, pathology, complications, 
treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

34 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

2. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis. 

Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission 

and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

25 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuBois and staff 

3. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations, students are 
taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to the care 
of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon 
managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Daum and Miss Daniels 

4. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medical 
nursing principles and methods to the care of patients on the 
medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition students study and 

[24] 




NUTRITION AND COOKERY CLASS 




SURGICAL TECHNIQUE DEMONSTRATED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS 



practice medical aseptic nursing as related to the care of patients 

suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. 

Practice includes care of patients during day, evening and night. 

Demonstrations and conferences. 

952 Hours, First, Second and Third Years 
(Includes 192 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Parker, Miss Daum, Miss Daniels, Miss Arey, 
Miss Eaman, Miss Lalime and staff 

5. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing to 
the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Miss Hobart, Miss O'Brien and staff 

Nursing 
1. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a general 
conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obliga- 
tions of each individual in choosing the profession; the impor- 
tance of general conduct in building up the right habits of living 
and attitudes of the nurse. Includes lectures in personal hygiene 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health espe- 
cially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her 
work. 

22 Hours, First Year 

No credit 

Miss Wolf, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost 

a. Introduction to Nursing Arts 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding 
of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her attitude 
toward her patient, the existing social relationships, the physical 
requirements for the proper care of patients and the procedures 
found most helpful for the promotion of health. 

125 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt 

b. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory prac- 
tice, in the surgical supply room and in the actual care of con- 
valescent patients in the pavilions and out-patient department 
of the hospital. 

309 Hours, First Year 
Miss Wyatt and Miss Zorn 

[26] 



2. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from its 
early conception to modern times. Lectures and panel discussions. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

3. Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems which arise 
in the practice of nursing. An attempt is made to coordinate 
this course closely with each course of nursing practice through 
class discussions of pertinent problems. Lectures and recitations. 

15 Hours, First Year 

Miss Wolf and Special Lecturers 

4. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the student has 
an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in the profes- 
sion; the need and opportunities for specialized preparation; the 
importance and types of legislation; the activities of professional 
organizations and the obligations of their members. Lectures 
and recitations. 

15 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Wolf and Special Lecturers 

5. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and deals 
with the application of these principles to emergency situations 
in the home and community. It demonstrates also the methods 
of teaching first aid to various groups. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to specific 
clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

1. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult nutrition and in food 

preparation. The nutrition requirements in childhood and in 

pregnancy are discussed during the student's practice on pediatric 

and obstetric services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

[27] 



2. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in treat- 
ment of disease by means of special dietaries given concurrently 
with the lectures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. Lectures, 
recitations and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

3. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital and in the out- 
patient clinic. Conferences and case studies. 

288 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen, Miss Perry 

and staff 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological changes 
during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care of the nor- 
mal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and baby; the pre- 
vention of complications; the social significance of infant and 
maternal mortality; the relation of obstetrics to various gyneco- 
logical conditions; the results of infection and tumor growth and 
the required surgical interference and operative treatment. Lec- 
tures. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Stander and staff 
Miss Rynbergen 

2. Principles of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruc- 
tion, observation and care; infant, obstetrical and gynecological 
nursing procedure with particular attention to infections and 
their special therapy. Classes, demonstrations and conferences. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Klein, Miss Geiger, 

Miss Geuss and Mrs. Babers 

3. Practice of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operat- 
ing rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out-patient depart- 
ment, students have the opportunity to observe and care for 

[28] 




BASKETBALL IS HEALTHFUL RECREATION 



infants and obstetrical and gynecological patients. Nursing prac- 
tice, case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Hickcox, Miss Doran, Miss Klein, 
Miss Geiger, Miss Geuss and staff 
Miss Frost and Mrs. Babers 

Pediatrics 

1. Pediatrics 

This course deals with normal growth and development and 
the diseases of infancy and childhood, with emphasis on infant 
welfare, prevention of morbidity and mortality and infant nutri- 
tion. Lectures and clinics. TT c , v 

30 Hours, becond Year 

Dr. Levine and staff 

2. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants and 
children are given together with the social, educational and nutri- 
tional aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal chil- 
dren. Classes, conferences and demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Ferguson, Miss Royle 

3. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing meth- 
ods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, formula 
laboratory, premature nursery, out-patient department and nur- 
sery school. Case studies and conferences. 

708 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Doran, Miss Stone, Miss 

Ferguson, Miss Royle, Miss Macpherson, Miss 

Coulter, Miss Correll and staff 

4. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The suscepti- 
bility of the child's behavior responses to the various details of 
family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

1. Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in Orientation Course.) 

[30] 



2. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular physical 
exercise designed primarily to maintain positive health with 
emphasis upon posture and corrective measures and to stimulate 
sportsmanship. 

128 Hours, First Year 

64 Hours, Second and Third Years 

Miss McDermott and Miss Glidden 

3. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on 
medical diseases emphasizing their social and economic aspects. 
It deals with the prevention of sickness and the promotion of 
health, with consideration of the contributing factors in home 
and community. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

4. Family and Community Health 

A course of study given as preparation for practice in com- 
munity nursing. It considers the underlying principles of public 
health nursing; the aims and scope of health activities both pub- 
lic and private. Lectures, conferences, family case studies. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Frost 

5. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Supervised nursing practice in the out-patient department and 
in the home through affiliation with Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service. Contact with the home and observation of community 
agencies is also furnished in the out-patient department through 
the social service department and the tuberculosis district. 

384 Hours, Third Year 

Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service 

Miss Favell and staff 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Miss Frost, Miss Banfield, Miss Abbott, Mrs. 

Overholser and staff 

Miss Soule and staff 

Psychiatry 

1. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their etiology, pathology and treatment. In- 

[31] 



eluded in this course is an historical survey of psychiatry and 
the mental hygiene movement, a discussion of the problems most 
frequently found in the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic and 
senile. An introduction to the techniques and social agencies 
available in helping people meet their problems. 

45 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

2. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understanding 
of the basic principles in the nursing care of psychopathic pa- 
tients and the nursing procedures used in their treatment. 
Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of mental illness to 
physical illness and of early development to future adult life. 
Lectures, demonstrations and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Harvey and staff 

3. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 

through supervised practice in and conferences on the care of 

children and adults in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. 

547 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Harvey and staff 

4. Special Therapeutics 

An opportunity is given the student to observe the application 
of hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies to the 
needs of the individual patient. Conferences and supervised prac- 
tice. 

146 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Brindle and Mr. Lawson 

Psychology 

1. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the un- 
derlying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. 
An effort is made to apply this study to the student's own per- 
sonality and give her a more scientific basis by which she can 

[32] 



get a better understanding of the behavior of herself, her co- 
workers and her patients. Recitations and lectures. 

30 I lours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 
2. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

A study of the deviations of adults and children, due to or- 
ganic and sociological factors, and of the nursing care necessary 
in assisting patients in making more adequate adjustments dur- 
ing illness. The principles of mental hygiene are emphasized. 

Lectures, recitations and clinics. tt t • ,. v 

15 Hours, hirst Year 

Miss Kennedy 
Development of Behavior of Children (See Pediatrics) 

c Surgical Nursing 

1. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference 
are discussed and the major steps in the operation outlined. 
Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms and observa- 
tions which should be made both preceding and following opera- 
tion as well as upon points which should be stressed in nursing 

these patients. TT ^. v 

r 44 Hours, rirst 1 ear 

Dr. Heuer and staff 

2. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures, clinics and demonstrations students are 
taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the 
nursing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed 
upon managerial and teaching problems. 

15 Hours, First Year 

8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, 
Miss Hills and Miss Harmon 

3. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of surgical 
nursing principles to the care of pre-operative and post-opera- 
tive patients on surgical pavilions of the hospital. Practice in- 
cludes care of patients during the day, evening and night. Dem- 
onstrations and conferences. 

8^6 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Parker, Miss Keller, Miss Grainger, Miss Hills, Miss 

Arey, Miss Harmon, Miss Lalime, Miss Eaman, Miss 

Yernstrom and staff 

r 33 1 



4. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give thorough preparation and to 
develop skill in surgical aseptic technique; to develop alertness 
to observations of significant changes in patients during the ad- 
ministration of anaesthetics; to develop dexterity and intelligent 
response in assisting with operations and in meeting emer- 
gencies in the general operating room and gynecological operat- 
ing room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations and conferences 
369 Hours, practice — Second Year 
Miss Parker, Miss Lyons, Miss Jensen and staff 




STUDY IN A CONFERENCE ROOM 



[34] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Officers 

Barklie Henry President 

William Harding Jackson ... Vice-President 

Augustine J. Smith Secretary 

Henry S. Sturgis Treasurer 

Hoard of Governors 

Augustine J. Smith Joseph H. Choate, Jr. Robert Winthrop 

Bronson Winthrop Frank L. Polk Henry S. Sturgis 

Cornelius N. Bliss John Hay Whitney PaulG. Pennoyer 

PaulTuckerman Vincent Astor Landon K. Thorn e 

William Woodward Barklie Henry W. Gibson Carey, Jr 

Arthur Iselin Langdon P.Marvin William Harding Jackson 

G. Beekman Hoppin Williamson Pell Walter G. Dunnington 

R. Horace Gallatin George T. Bowdoin 



A dministrator-in-Chief 

Murray Sargent 

Superintendent 
George W. Wheeler, M.D. 



Assistant to the Treasurer 
Walter J. Nichols 

Custodian 

United States Trust Company of New York 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Augustine J. Smith, Chairman 
Barklie Henry, Vice -Chair man 
Anna D. Wolf, R. N., Secretary 



Class of 1941 



Eugene F. Du Bois, M.D. 



Flora Rose 



Class of 1942 



Mary M. Roberts, R.N 



Augustine J. Smith 



George W. Wheeler, M.D. 



Class of 1943 



Mary Beard, R.N. 



Ex-Officio 
Barklie Henry, President of The Society of the New York Hospital 
Edmund E. Day, President of Cornell University 
Murray Sargent, A dministrator-in-Chief 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D., President of the Medical Board 
Anna D. Wolf, R.N., Director of the School of Nursing 

[35] 



ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary Beard, Chairman 
Minnie H. Jordan Annie W. Goodrich, Vice-Chairman Lillian D. Wald 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Executive-Curriculum Committee 

Anna D. Wolf, Chairman Cora Kay Agnes Schubert 

Charlotte S. Argabrite May Kennedy Carolyne Sprogell 

Gertrude Banfield Alice Maud Moffatt Margaret Wyatt, 

Harriet Frost Sarah E. Moore Secretary 

Verda Hickcox Bessie A. R. Parker 

Committee on Admissions 
Eleanor Corrigan, Chairman Dorothy Jacobus Mrs. Marjery Overholser 
Margaret Grainger Sarah E. Moore Margaret Wyatt 

Committee on Library, Publications and Teaching Facilities 
May Kennedy, Chairman Harriet Frost Florence M. Harvey 

Flora Bergstrom Elizabeth Geiger Edna Royle 

Helen Daum Margaret Grainger Henderika Rynbergen 

Committee on Nursing Principles and Practices 
Margaret Wyatt, Chairman Sarah Ferguson Dorothy Hobart 

Sylvia Abbott Catherine Geuss Margaret Joinville 

Fern Christensen Thirza Hills 

Medical Advisory Committee 
(appointed by the Medical Board) 
Dr. Herbert F. Trout, Chairman Dr. Bronson Ray 

Dr. John Draper Dr. Kirby M. Martin 

Dr. Gervais M. McAuliffe Dr. John A. Washington 

Dr. Oswald S. Lowsley Dr. Bruce Webster 

Dr. George W. Wheeler 

Committee on Professional Memberships 
Mary Klein, Chairman Catherine Geuss Philomene Marshall 

Elsie Fiege Florence M. Harvey Mildred Stone 

Veronica Lyons 

Committee on Records 
May Kennedy, Chairman Yerda Hickcox Bessie Parker 

Florence Harvey Agnes Schubert 

Committee on Revisions and Resolutions 
Cora Kay, Chairman Charlotte Argabrite 

Persis Arey Harriet Frost 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 
Harriet Frost, Chairman Isobel Donnelly Dr. Marian Tyndall 

Gertrude Banfield Eleanor Lewis Ruth Wilson 

Elsie Davies Della Meachard 

Committee on Student Extra-Curricular Activities 
Gertrude Banfield, Chairman Mary McDermott 

Eleanor Corrigan Bessie Parker 

[36] 



OFFICERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Anna D. Wolf, M.A., R.N. 

Director of the School of Nursing 
and Director of the Nursing Service 

B.A. Goucher College, 1911; Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 191 5; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1 9 1 6 ; Robb Fellow, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1925-1926; Instructor and Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 1916-1919; Instructor of Nursing. 
Vassar Training Camp tor Nurses, Summer 1918; Superintendent of 
Nurses, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, China, 191 9-1 924; Dean 
of the School of Nursing, ibid., 1924-1925; Associate Professor of Nursing 
and Superintendent of Nurses, The University Clinics, The University 
of Chicago, 1926-1929; Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of 
Nursing, ibid., 1929-193 1 ; Director of the School of Nursing and Director 
of the Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 193 1-. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Public Health Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course in Public 
Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915-1916; As- 
sistant Superintendent and Superintendent of Nurses, St. John's Hospital, 
1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer Hospital, Trenton, 1913-1915 ; Direc- 
tor, Department of Instruction, Visiting Nurse Society, Philadelphia, 191 6- 
1932; Supervisor, Public Health Nursing Department, Pennsylvania 
School of Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; Associate Director, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Public Health 
Nursing, ibid., 1932-. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Director, School of Nursing; 
Director of Pedagogy 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 191 7; M.A. University of Chicago, 1932; 
Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; General Staff Nurse and 
Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary Forces, France, 1918-1919; Super- 
intendent of Nurses, Indianapolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; Director of 
Nursing and Director of Illinois State School of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Illinois Department of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931 ; Director of Institutes, 1922-; 
Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, one semester, 1931-1932; Lecturer, 
De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate Director, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing 1932- ; Director, Pedagogy, ibid., 1932-. 

[37 1 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS & MEMBERS OF OTHER 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS * 

Charlotte S. Argabrite, R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, 
Night Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing, 1907; Charge, 
Surgical Supply Room, Bellevue Hospital, 1907-1908; Private Duty, 
1 909-191 3; Night Supervisor, Bellevue Hospital, 1913-1914; First As- 
sistant Superintendent of Nurses, Bellevue Hospital, 1914; Superintendent 
of Nurses, Hinton Hospital, Hinton, West Virginia, 1914-1915; Acting 
Superintendent of Nurses, Columbia Hospital, Washington, D. C, 1917; 
Superintendent of Nurses, Harlem Hospital, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 
1919-1930; Registrar, District Registry for Nurses, 1931-1932; Registrar, 
Bellevue Alumnae Registry, 1932-1934; Administrative Assistant, Night 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1935 ; Administrative Assistant, 
Evening Nursing Service, ibid, 1936; Private Duty, 1937-1938; Adminis- 
trative Assistant, Night Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Gertrude S. Banfield, B.A., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruc- 
tion and Sen ice 

BA. Vassar, 191 8; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, 1920; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Pres- 
byterian Hospital, New York, 1920; General Staff Nurse and Head 
Nurse, Out-Patient Department, Peking Union Medical College, Peking, 
China, 1 921 -1924; Supervisor, Max Epstein Clinics, The University of 
Chicago Clinics, 1927-193 1 ; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932- ; Head of Out-Patient Nursing Instruction and 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

S. Margaret Gillam, M.A. 

Director, Department of Nutrition 

Teacher's Diploma, Home Economics, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, 
New York, 1916; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1922; 
M.A., ibid., 1923; Dietitian, Rochester General Hospital, 1918-1919; 
Superintendent, Woman's Industrial Home, Medical Lake, Washington, 
1919-1921 ; Director, Dietetics and Housekeeping, University of Michigan 



Arranged alphabetically. 

[38] 



Hospital, 1923-1932; Instructor, Institutional Management, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, Summers [924-1930 and 1935-; Instructor, 
Nutrition, Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of 
Michigan, 1925-1932; Instructor in Nutrition, Extension Division, ibid.. 
1930; Director, Department of Nutrition, The New York Hospital. 
I932-. 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing Instruction and Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
191 6; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of Civics and Philan- 
thropy, 1 9 1 9 ; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
C. M. B., General Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, 
England, 1928; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospital, 
Morenci, Arizona, 1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army Base 
Hospital No. 13, France, 191 8-1 919; Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychi- 
atric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, American 
Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 1920-1922; Private Duty, 1922-1924; 
General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospital, 1924-1925; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Association, York, 
Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to Director, Brooklyn 
Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of Midwifery and Super- 
visor of Obstetrical and Gynecological Departments, Siriraj Hospital, 
Bangkok, Siam, 1929-1931; Consultant Nurse, Maternity, Infancy and 
Child Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, 193 1- 1932; As- 
sistant Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; 
Head of Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Instruction and Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Cora E. Kay, B.S., R.N. 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1921 ; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Supervisor of Wards, Allegheny 
General Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1921-1923; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, St. Louis, 1923-1926; 
Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 1926-1927; Principal, School of Nursing and Director, 
Nursing Service, Chicago Memorial Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice and Second Assistant to Superintendent 
of Nurses, Clifton Springs Sanitarium and Clinic, 1929-1932; Evening 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1937; Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, ibid., 
I937-. 

[39] 



Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Director, Nurses' Residence; 
Instructor, Physical Education 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, 1917, 1919, 1931 ; People's College, Den- 
mark, 1926; B.S. New York University, 1930; M.A. ibid., 1932; Super- 
visor, Physical Education, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, 
N. Y., 1915-1918; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts, 191 8-1 9 19; Supervisor of Playground, Concord, 
Massachusetts, 1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, City Schools, Revere, 
Massachusetts, 1919-1921 ; Supervisor of Playground, Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts, 1 92 1 ; Director, Recreation and Physical Education, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts, 1921-1922; Director, Recreation, City of New Haven, 
1922-1924; Director, Physical Education and Health, State Teachers 
College, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1924- 1929; Director, Physical Edu- 
cation, Dalton Experimental School, New York, 1 930-1 931 ; Assistant 
Director Student Activities, New York University, 1931-1932; Instructor, 
Physical Education, ibid., Summer, 1932; Instructor, Physical Education, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-; Director, Nurses' 
Residence, ibid., 1932-. 



Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Head of Private Patients' Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 2; Private Duty, 
1912-1915; General Staff Nurse, Hopital Militaire V. R. 76, France, 
19 1 5-19 1 6; Supervisor, Private Patients' Building, The New York Hos- 
pital, 191 7-1932; Head of Private Patients Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 



Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 3; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, and New York 
University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public Schools, 1903-1908; 
Head Nurse, The New York Hospital, 1913-1918; Instructor, Practical 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 8-1922; Assist- 
ant Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923-1932; Acting Directress of Nurses, 
ibid., 1932; Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-. 

[40] 



Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, 
I lead of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services. 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School tor Nurses, 
Providence, 191 8; B.S. Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1937; 
Teacher, Public Schools, 1905-1915; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
and Instructor, Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Training School 
for Nurses, 1918-1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instruc- 
tor, Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1920-192 1 ; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instructor, Nursing 
Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, 
1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926-1932; Administrative 
Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; 
Assistant Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936-; 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Instruction and Services, The 
New York Hospital, 1936-. 



Agnes Schubert, M.S., R. N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction 
and Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 191 7; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1932; Evening Supervisor, Babies' and Children's 
Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assistant Instructor 
and Supervisor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Director, ibid., 1928-1930; 
Supervisor and Instructor, Bobs Roberts Hospital, The University of Chi- 
cago Clinics, 1930-1931; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932-; Head of Pediatric Nursing Instruction and 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 



Theodate H. Soule, M.A. 

Director, Social Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1 9 1 7 ; B.S. Simmons College School of Social Work, 
1919; M.A. University of Chicago School of Social Service Administra- 
tion, 1929; Medical Social Worker, Massachusetts General Hospital, 
1919-1923; Director of Social Service, Municipal Hospital, Hartford, 
Connecticut, 1923-1927 and 1934-1938; Head Worker, Pediatric Social 
Service, Washington University Clinics and Allied Hospitals, St. Louis, 
1 929- 1 934; Director of Social Service, New York Hospital, 1938-. 

[4'] 




CORNER IX STUDENT LOUNGE 




IN FICTION LIBRARY 



Carolyn e A. Sprogkll, R.S., R.N. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing; 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Head Nurse, South- 
ampton Hospital. 1924; Night Supervisor, ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 
1920; Assistant Superintendent and Instructor, Practical Nursing, South- 
ampton Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1930-1931 ; 
Acting Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant Director, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Director, Psychiatric Nursing, 
Pavne Whitnev Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 



[43] 



INSTRUCTORS AND SUPERVISORS * 

Sylvia Abbott, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service 
Diploma, Washington State Normal School, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, 
Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, 1931; Certificate in 
Public Health Nursing, Simmons College, 1938; Charge Nurse, Mary 
Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York, 1931-1932; Staff 
Nurse, Community Health Association, Boston, 1932-1937; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1938- ; Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Dorothy E. Allison, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1932; General Staff Nurse, Obstetrical and Gynecological Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1934; Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, 
ibid., 1934-1936; Private Duty, 1936-1937; Instructor, Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; 
Night Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Persis S. Arey, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; 
Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1934; Instructor, 
Nursing Principles and Practice, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1921-1924; Assistant Instructor, Nursing Principles and Practice, 
Indiana University Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; Supervisor, Out- 
Patient Department, Providence Lying-in Hospital, 1927-1930; Super- 
visor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Department, Strong Memorial 
Hospital, 1931-1933; Supervisor, Maternity Department, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Philadelphia, 1935; Second Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Rhode Island Hospital, 1936; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Services, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Louisa Toms Babers 

Dietitian, Womans Clinic 
B.S. Elmira College, 1934; Dietetic Certificate, Fifth Avenue Hospital, 
1935; Dietitian, Fifth Avenue Hospital, 1935-1936; Dietitian, F. W. 

* Arranged alphabetically. 

[44] 



Woolworth Company, 1936-1938; Dietitian, Womans Clinic, The New 

York Hospital, 1938-. 

Hexriktta P. Bouton, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Medical Social 
Service Principles and Practice 

B.A. Wellesley College, 1906; Diploma in Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; Part-time Student, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1924, 1 9 3 1 ; Instructor, Medical Social Service Principles and 
Practice, The New York Hospital Social Service Department, 1933-. 

Barbara Correll, B.S. 

Dietitian, Children's Clinic 

B.S. Eureka College, Eureka, Illinois, 1928; Graduate of Dietetics, St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929; Dietitian, Madison Hospital, New 
York City, 1930-1932; Dietitian, Surgical Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1935; Dietitian, Children's Clinic and Milk Formula Room, 
ibid., I935-. 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, R.N. 

Instructor and Administrative Assistant, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1927; Post-graduate Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933-1939; 
Operating Room Supervisor, St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932- 
1935; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic; The 
New York Hospital, 1935-1937; Administrative Assistant, ibid., 1937-. 

Virginia Daniels, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Beloit College, 1923-1924; Frances Shimer Junior College, 1925-1926; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1930; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1937; General Staff 
Nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 1930-1931 ; Private Duty and 
Staff Nurse, Chicago Visiting Nurse Association, 1931-1932; General 
Staff Nurse, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1936; Instructor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; 
Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1936-1937; Instructor, Medical Nursing, The New York 

[45] 



Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Supervisor, Medical Nursing, The 
New York Hospital, 1937-. 



Helen M. Daum, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 191 8; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Private Duty Nursing, 
1918-1929; School Nursing, Ottawa, Illinois, 1929-1930; Head Nurse, 
Medical Pavilion, The New York Hospital, 1932- 1934; Instructor, Med- 
ical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1934- ; Assistant 
Medical Supervisor, The New York Hospital, 1934-1935; Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service, ibid., 1935-. 

Catharine Dimock, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1935; Student Dietitian, Food Clinic, 
Boston Dispensary, 1935-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1936-. 

Ruth Doran, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Public Health Nursing 

B.A. University of Illinois, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1924; Certificate in Midwifery, Lobenstine 
Midwifery Clinic, 1934; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1938; Head Nurse and Night Supervisor, Woman's Clinic, Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital, 1 924- 1 92 7; Head Nurse, Medical Ward, Albert Merritt 
Billings Hospital, 1927-1928; Instructor, Ophthalmological Nursing, Wil- 
mer Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1929-1930; Evening Supervisor, 
Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, 1930-1931 ; Director, Obstetrical Nurs- 
ing Service, St. Louis Maternity Hospital, 1932-1936; Instructor, Public 
Health Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937-. 



Gertrude M. Eaman, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Victoria Hospital School of Nursing, London, Can- 
ada, 1937; B.S., University of Western Ontario, 1937; General Staff 
Nurse, Medical and Surgical Service, The New York Hospital, 1937- 
1938; Assistant Head Nurse, ibid., 1938-1939; Head Nurse, Emergency 
Pavilion, ibid., 1 939-1 940; Supervisor, ibid., 1940-; Instructor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1940-. 

[46] 



Sarah M. FERGUSON, R.N. 



Instructor and Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 



Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Huston, 
1932; Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1938; General Staff Nurse, 
Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Pediatric Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, i ( )37-; Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 



Elin Friberg, R.N. 

Instructor and Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital, 1932; Post-Graduate 
Course in Psychiatry, Bloomingdale Hospital, 1932-1933; Part-time Stu- 
dent. Teacher's College, Columbia University and Hunter College, 1934- 
1938; General Staff Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1933-1934; Assistant Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1935; Instructor. 
Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; 
Assistant Night Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1935-. 



E. Elizabeth Geiger, R.N. 

Instructor New Born Care and Supervisor of 
Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service. 

Student, Illinois Woman's College, 1919-1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Wes- 
ley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; Part-time Student, 
University of Chicago, 1934-1936; Supervisor, Pediatric Department, 
Wesley Memorial Hospital, 1925-1927; Supervisor, Out Patient Depart- 
ment, Northwestern University Medical School, 1927-1933; Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1933; Supervisor, 
ibid., 1933-1934; Supervisor, Staff Health Service and Director, Social 
Activities, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1934-1936; Instructor, 
New Born Care. The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; 
Supervisor of Nurseries, Obstetrical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 



Catherine P. Geuss, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 1924; 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; 

1 47 1 



Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 
1929; Student, University of Chicago, 1930; B.S. and Diploma in Super- 
vision, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; Student, Columbia 
University, 1938; Teacher, 1919-1924; Head Nurse and Instructor, Ob- 
stetrical Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital, 1929- 1930; Supervisor, Sur- 
gical Wards, ibid., 1930-1931; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Assistant 
Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1935; Supervisor, ibid., 1935-. 

Margaret F. Grainger, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Surgical Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service 

B.A. Butler University, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1930; Head Nurse, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1930-1931; Assistant Director, Practical Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1931-1934; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1934-1935; Instructor, Surgical and Urological 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935- ; Supervisor, 
Surgical and Urological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service 

B.A. College of Wooster, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 1931 ; General Staff Nurse, Presbyterian 
Hospital, Chicago, 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, The New York Hos- 
pital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1937; Instructor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937; 
Night Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1937-1938; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1938- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Florence M. Harvey, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

B.S. Colby College, 1925; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1934; P° st Graduate Course, Psychiatry, 
Westchester Division, New York Hospital, 1934; Student, Teacher's Col- 
lege, Columbia University, 1937; General Staff Nurse, Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic; The New York Hospital, 1935; Head Nurse, ibid., 
1936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, Butler Hospital, Providence, 1938; 
Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1939- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 
1 939-- 

[48] 



Thirza L. Hills, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor 
Surgical Nursing Service 

University of Illinois, 1916-1918; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, Chicago, 1925; Student, University of Chicago, 
Summer, 1927; Course in Public Health Nursing, Henry Street Settle- 
ment, two months, 1936; Part-time Student, Teachers' College, Colum- 
bia University, 1937-1938; Staff nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 
1925-1926; Assistant Night Supervisor, ibid., 1926-1927; Instructor, 
Surgical Procedures, ibid., 1928-1929; Head Nurse, ibid., 1929-1932; 
Head Nurse, Obstetrical Service and Surgical Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1935; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1935-; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1935-. 

Dorothy Hobart, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Private Patient Nursing Service 

B.S. Denison University, 1925; Diploma in Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; Part-time Student, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, Fall 1928, 1934, 1937; Teacher, 1925-1930; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse, Private Patient Service, The New York Hospital, 1933- 
1934; Head Nurse, Semi-Private Floor, ibid., 1934-1937; Instructor, Pri- 
vate Patient Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937-; 
Supervisor, Private Patient Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 
I937-. 

Margaret Joinytlle, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Hunter College and Teacher's College, Columbia University, 1933- 
1939; Private Duty, 1 929-1 93 1 ; Assistant Head Nurse, Bloomingdale 
Hospital, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- ; Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, 
The New York Hospital, 1936-. 

Caroline Keller, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

B.A. Smith College, 1921 ; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, 1929; Instructor, Miss Day's School, 
New Haven, 1921-1924; Instructor, The Holman School, Philadelphia, 

[49] 



1924-1925; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, New Haven Hospital, 1929- 
1930; Assistant Supervisor, Surgical Nursing, New Haven Hospital, 
I930I932; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1 932-. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 1916; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918-1921; 
Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921-1925; Supervisor, 
Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head Nurse, Maternity Hospital, 
Western Reserve University, 1929-1930; Supervisor and Assistant In- 
structor, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Supervisor, Ob- 
stetrical and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 
1 932-. 

Marie A. Lalime, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Misericordia Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; 
Part-time Student, Teacher's College, Fordham University, 1933-1934; 
Head Nurse, Male Surgery, Misericordia Hospital, 1926-1927; Private 
Duty, 1927-1928; Supervisor in Obstetrics, Misericordia Hospital, 1928- 
1935; Private Duty, 1935-1936; General Staff Nurse, The New York 
Hospital, 1936-1937; Evening Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, ibid., 
1937-1938; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1938- ; Evening Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Service, The New York Hospital, 1938-. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service 

B.A. Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 
1928; Nurse in Charge, Urological Clinic, New Haven Hospital, 1928- 
1929; Psychiatric Nursing, Four Winds Sanatorium, Katonah, New York, 
1 929- 1 932; Assistant Head Nurse, Children's Service, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Staff Nurse, ibid., 1933- 
1934; Staff Nurse, Brooklyn Visiting Nurse Association, 1934-1935; In- 
structor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1935- ; Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, Payne Whit- 
ney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1935-. 

[50] 



Veronica Lyons, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and 
Practice; Supervisor, General 
Operating Rooms. 
Cornell University, 192 1 -1922; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital School for Nurses, 1927; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1936; Head Nurse, Gynecological Ward, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1 927- 1 928; Head Nurse, Surgical and Gynecological Ward, Binghamton 
City Hospital, 1928-1929; Suture Nurse, Operating Room, Moore- 
Overton Hospital, Binghamton, 1929; Office Assistant, Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat Surgeon, 1929-193 1 ; Instructor, Nursing Principles and 
Practice, Montefiore Hospital School of Nursing, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, 
Woman's Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Assistant to Di- 
rector of Nurses, New Rochelle Hospital, 1936-1937; Instructor, Opera- 
tive Technique and Practice, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
I 937S Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, The New York Hospital, 
I937-. 

Lucy J. Macdonald, R.N. 

Supervisor, Private Operating Room 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; Head 
Nurse, Surgical Ward, The New York Hospital, 1927; Suture Nurse, 
Public Operating Room, ibid., 1928-193 1 ; Supervisor, Private Operating 
Room, ibid., 1932; Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, ibid., 1932-1933; 
Supervisor, Private Operating Room, ibid., 1934-. 

Ola Macpherson, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; 
General Staff Nurse, Pediatric Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 
1937-1938; Assistant Head Nurse, ibid., 1938-1939; Instructor, Pediatric 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939-; Night Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1939-. 



Ethel Oatman, R.N. 

Instructor and Night Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Butler Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time 
Student, Brown University, 1929-1930; Part-time Student, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1935-1936; Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1937-1939; As- 
sistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Butler Hospital, 1929-1930; Pri- 
vate Duty, 1 93 1 ; General Staff Nurse, Syracuse Memorial Hospital, 1932- 

L51] 



1936; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 
1936; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1937- J Night Supervisor, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New 
York Hospital, 1937-. 

Madeleine O'Brien, R.N. 

Evening Supervisor, 

Private Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1924; 
Charge Nurse, Men's Medical Pavilion, The New York Hospital, 1925; 
Private Nursing, 1926-1937; Evening Supervisor, Private Patient Nurs- 
ing Service, The New York Hospital, 193 7-. 

Marjery Treiber Overholser, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 

Pediatric Out Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1922; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; Private Duty and Gen- 
eral Staff Nursing, 1922- 1926; Supervisor, Pediatric Department, Bellevue 
Hospital, 1927-1928; Charge, Pediatric Department, ibid., 1928-1929; 
Assistant Director of Nurses, Reading General Hospital, 1929- 1930; 
Teaching Supervisor, ibid., 1930-1932; Supervisor of Nurseries, New York 
Hospital, 1932-1936; Assistant Director of Nurses and Supervisor of Clin- 
ical Instruction, Hahnemann Hospital, 1938-1939; Instructor, Pediatric 
Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939- ; Supervisor, Pe- 
diatric Out Patient Nursing Service, New York Hospital, 1939-. 

Mabel W. Perry, B.S. 

Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic 

B.S. Battle Creek College, 1933; Dietetic Certificate, Montefiore Hospi- 
tal, 1934; Dietitian, Food Clinic, Boston Dispensary, 1934; Associate 
Dietitian, Food Clinic, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, 1935; Research Die- 
titian, Diagnostic Hospital, New England Medical Center, Boston, 1935- 
1936; Dietitian, Burrough's Newsboys Foundation Health Education De- 
partment, Boston, 1934-1936; Dietitian, Nutrition Clinic, The New York 
Hospital, 1 936-. 

Edna E. Royle, R.N. 

Instructor and Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia School of 
Nursing, 1931; Summer School and Part-time Student, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1934, 1937; Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1938; Head Nurse and Instructor, Milk Laboratory, Chil- 

[52] 



dren's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1931 ; Assistant Educational Director, 
ibid., 1931-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937-; Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1937-. 



Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S. 

Instructor, Nutrition 

B.S. Simmons College, 1922; M.S. Cornell University Medical College, 
1938; Nutrition Worker Neighborhood Kitchen, Boston, 1922-1924; Food 
Clinic Dietitian, Washington University Dispensary, Barnes and Allied 
Hospitals, St. Louis, 1924-1926; Head Dietitian, Sea View Hospital, New 
York, 1927; Ward Dietitian, Presbyterian Hospital, New York, 1927- 
1928; Food Clinic Dietitian, Vanderbilt Clinic, ibid., 1 928-1929; Dieti- 
tian, American University Hospital, Beirut, Syria, 1929- 1934 5 Instructor 
in Nutrition, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, I934- J 938; 
Instructor of Chemistry, Physiology and Nutrition, ibid., 1938-. 



Mildred N. Stone, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Student, University of Vermont, 1928-1929; Diploma in Nursing, The 
Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 1932; Part-time Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936-1938; General Staff 
Nurse, Assistant Head Nurse and Head Nurse, Pediatric Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Evening Supervisor, ibid., 1935-1936; 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1936-1937; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- '■> Evening Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 



Dorothy Verxstrom, R.N. 

Night Instructor and Supervisor, 
Medical & Surgical Nursing Service 

Women's College, Brown University, 1925-1926; Diploma in Nursing, 
Truesdale Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; Courses at Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1932 and 1939; Assistant Instructor, Nursing Arts, 
Truesdale Hospital School of Nursing, 1 930-1 931 ; Staff Nurse, Providence 
District Nurse Service, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, Medical Service, New 
York Hospital, 1932-1935; Science Instructor, Memorial Hospital School 
of Nursing, Pawtucket, 1936-1938; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Truesdale Hospital, 1938-1939; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939- ; Head Nurse and Night 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Service, New York Hospital, 1939-. 

[53] 



Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Instructor and Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical 
and Gynecological Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1924, 
Part-time Student, ibid., 1933, 1934, 1935; Part-time Student, New York 
University, 1937-1938; Post-Graduate Course, Obstetrics, Woman's Hos- 
pital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Ward, Temple 
University Hospital, 1924-1925; Supervisor, Babies' Hospital, Philadel- 
phia, 1926-1928; Assistant Superintendent, Columbia Hospital, 1928-1929; 
Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, Temple University Hospital, 1930; 
Instructor, Obstetrical and Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1932- ; Evening Supervisor, Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-. 

Mary Kyer West, R.N. 

Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice; 
Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing, Troy, New 
York, 1932; General Staff Nurse, Samaritan Hospital, 1932-1933; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Operating Rooms, The New York 
Hospital, 1933-1937; Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937- ; Assistant Supervisor, Gen- 
eral Operating Rooms, The New York Hospital, 1937-. 

Margaret Wyatt, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor, Nursing Arts 

B.A. Meredith College, 1923; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1927; Student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, Summers 1931-1935; Instructor and Assistant to the Dean of 
Women, Meredith College, 1923-1924; Head Nurse, Surgical Ward, The 
New York Hospital, 1927- 1930; Instructor, Nursing Arts, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1930-. 



[54] 



HEAD NURSES AND CHARGE NURSES 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS 



K. N. 
, R.N. 

R. N. 



Margaret Bissell, R.N. 
Ei.sie Bohnel, R.N. 
Mrs. Ruth Brock m \\, 
Muriel Carbery, B.A. 
Fern E. Christensen, 
Barbara Derr, R.N. 
Isorel Donnelly, R.N. 
Bernadette Dumas, R.N. 
Antoinette Fedorowicz, R.N. 
Elizabeth Fairclough, R.N. 
Mary Haver, B.S., R.N. 
Mrs. Helen Helmus, R.N. 



Medical and Surgical Services 

Knoi)\ HlNES, R.N. 

Mrs. Eleanor Huested, R.N. 

Beatrice Josey, R.N. 

Rosalind MacLean, M.A., R.N. 

Dorothy Meyer, R.N. 

Nina Rusk, R.N. 

Rosalind SEUBERLING, R.N. 

Charlotte Sowers, R.N. 

Charlotte Steuer, R.N. 

Mrs. Frances Timpanelli, R.N. 

Mrs. Eunice Volpe, R.N. 

Kmherine Zorn, R.N. 



Mrs. Anne Beard, R.N. 
Evelyn S. Clark, R.N. 
Alcida H. Coulter, R.N. 
Mrs. Katherine Drucklieb, 
Elsie M. Fiege, R.N. 
Willetta Haynes, R.N. 
Mrs. Vivian B. Hyer, R.N. 
Martha Johnson, R.N. 
Lucile Lambert, R.N. 



Out-Patient Service 

Evelyn Liddle, R.N. 
Pauline Murphy, R.N. 
Mrs. Elsa Nussbaumer, R.N. 
R.N. Florence Orlopp, R.N. 

Mrs. Celia Pehr, R.N. 
Margaret Rouchleau, R.N. 
Norma Sanford, B.A., R.N. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Talbot, R.N. 
Rebecca Talbott, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 



Stella Copley, R.N. 
Inez Gnau, R.N. 
Martin Grothe, R.N. 
Mrs. Doris Jacobson, R.N. 
Mary Kutz, R.N. 
Grace Lundgren, R.N. 



Norween Fisher, R.N. 
Margaret Kelly, R.N. 



Mrs. Beatrice McKee, R.N. 
William Roy, R.N. 
Mrs. Blanche Skerky, R.N. 
Jessie Weaver, R.N. 
Arlene Wilson, R.N. 
Faye Wise, R.N. 

Pediatric Service 

Catherine O'Neil, R.N. 
Ruth Woodfall, R.N. 



Private and Semi-Private Services 
Marjorie Arehart, R.N. L. Marguerite McGrath, 



Alma Blenkin, R.N. 
Alice Burlin, R.N. 
Mrs. Marie B. Clarke, 
Grace Coates, R.N. 



Estelle Ash, R.N. 
Margaret Benson, R.N. 
Henrietta Eppink, R.N. 
Dorothy S. Fisher, R.N. 
Edith Gaeckle, R.N. 
Beulah M. Hartman, R.N. 
Virginia Henry, R.N. 



Philomene M. Marshall, 
Grace Pepperman, R.N. 
R.N. Jeanette Stone, R.N. 

Myrna Wight, R.N. 
Helen Yesulaitis, R.N. 

Woman's Clinic 

Eda E. Hoevvischer, R.N. 
Mildred A. Jensen, R.N. 
Veronica Matus, R.N. 
Mary Potter, R.N. 
Rose Valpreda, R.N. 
Gertrude Weber, R.N. 
Ruth Wilson, R.N. 



R.N. 
R.N. 



[55] 



ASSISTANT HEAD NURSES 
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICES 



Medical and Surgical Services 



Mary Aixsworth, R.X. 
Mary Capua no, R.N. 
Beulah E. Detrick, R.N. 
Doris Dieterle, R.N. 
Alberta Dunn, R.N. 
Elizabeth Flaherty, R.N. 
Cecelia Goral, R.N. 
Alice Hall, R.N. 
Barbara Handy, R.N. 
Rita Hickey, R.N. 
Ruth Hoskins, R.N. 
Vira Hufcut, B.S., R.N. 
Mrs. Winnie Kistler, R.N. 
Cornelia Kittredge, R.N. 
Clara Long, R.N. 



Mrs. Jessie Macintosh, R.N. 
Dorothea Nelson, R.N. 
Pauline Roberts, B.A., R.N. 
Ella Rowe, R.N. 
Anita Scheel, R.N. 
Margaret Sharp, R.N. 
Beatrice Snyder, R.N. 
Dorothy Stevenson, R.N. 
Edna Stratton, R.N. 
Carol Sturtevant, R.N. 
Rozalia Sturz, B.A., R.N . 
Eva Watkin, R.N. 
Arlene Webster, R.N. 
Margaret Wilson, R.N. 
Rosa Yonke, R.N. 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 



WlLLARD BOULDEN, R.N. 

Norma Dorland, R.N. 
Donald Gilbert, R.N. 
Mary Goforth, R.N. 
Elizabeth Hilliard, R.N 
Mary Jenkins, R.N. 



Florence Klingelhofer, R.N. 
Margaret Peterson, R.N. 
Laura Robertson, R.N. 
Dorothy Smith, R.N. 
Charles Taylor, R.N. 
Alice Thoreson, R.N. 
Dorothy Welborn, R.N. 



Lucy L. Church, R.N. 



Pediatric Service 

Agnes Rieman, R.N. 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Alice Bahr, R.N. 
Elizabeth Becker, R.N. 
Fredrika Melvtn, R.N. 
Alberta Miller, R.N. 



Natalie Pettit, R.N. 
Barbara Rowland, R.N. 
Melvine Rummler, R.N. 
Mrs. Virginia S. Sweeney, R.N. 
Lois Mary Tait, R.N. 



Woman's Clinic 



Loretta Baker, R.N. 
Jeanette Bedford, R.N. 
Wilma V. Benner, R.N. 
Amelia Alice Bowman, R.N. 
Selma F. Buchdahl, R.N. 
Mrs. Florence Campbell, R.N, 
Thelma Cobb, R.N. 
Marciana Cortes, R.N. 
Eunice Greenwood, R.N. 
Elizabeth Hazen, R.N. 



Grace Dorothy Kingsley, R.N. 
Mary C. Littler, R.N. 
Helen Mackdanz, R.N. 
Kathryn Phillips, R.N. 
Frieda Schmidt, R.N. 
Florence J. Shive, R.N. 
Elizabeth Wiley, R.N. 

MOLLIE WlLLARD, R.N. 

Louise Woermbke, R.N. 
Loretta Ellen Wright, R.N. 



[56] 



STUDENT AND STAFF HEALTH 

Marian Tyndall, M.I) Physician-in-Charge 

Edwin J. Don, M.I). Consultant Psychiatrist 

Elsie Davies, R.N Supervisor, Infirmary 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora Josephine Bergstrom, R.X Librarian 

Ella Bullen, B.A Secretary 

Helen Cleary Secretary 

Dorothy Jacobus, B.A Secretary-Registrar 

Elizabeth Park, B.A Secretary 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE FACULTY 
AND OTHERS PARTICIPATING IN INSTRUCTION* 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Chester Loomis Yntema, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 



Eugene F. DuBois, M.D., and Staff Professor of Medicine 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D., and Staff Professor of Psychiatry 

George S. Heuer, M.D., and Staff Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D., and Staff Professor of Pediatrics 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D., and Staff . Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 



To be appointed Instructor of Massage 

R. C. Redden, M.D Instructor, Emergency Nursing 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D 

Professor of Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University 



MEMBERS OF AFFILIATING ORGANIZATIONS 

Katharine Favell, M.A., R.N Visiting Nurse Service, 

General Director of Nursing Henry Street Settlement 



* Arranged alphabetically. 

[57] 




ON THE WAY TO HOSPITAL 



If after reading this bulletin there are 
further questions, write to the Director of the 
School of Nursing, The New York Hospital, 
525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York, N. Y. 
An application form will be sent upon request 
if an applicant is able to satisfy the entrance 
requirements.